Domrob

18” speedline alloys need refurbing but not wanted

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Hi!

 

just got myself a 2010 A3 sportsback S line (8P) which has some genuine Audi Speedline alloys on. They look okay but I prefer the Rotor wheels, or something less fussy

 

unfortunately mine need refurbing, but cost £150 EACH to get done. £600 on alloys I’m not that keen on isn’t happening. Tried selling them on Facebook and nothing, local companies aren’t interested in them cos they take so long to fix, but they are worth a bit of money done nicely

 

is there some online company that would give me decent cash?

 

thanks in advance

EE23FDE8-D6CA-4043-B27D-E5CE9D1968EC.jpeg

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Perhaps it's not your thing to DIY but I've done a couple of sets and the results have been great. Need to get the tyres off... make good the scuffs with the least sanding possible... prep the paint... etch prime... grey undercoat... top coat... clearcoat. I heated up a small garden shed with a fan heater to aid paint drying between coats.

Been a year since I did these on my Mondeo and despite giving them no extra care and occasional car wash use they still look perfect.

 

 

Wheel corrosion.JPG

Wheel new tyre and c.cap.jpg

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That’s really impressive David. As a matter of interest, what was the finished colour name/code? Could be useful to other members on here. 

Hello Dom,

Its probably me, but I’m not quite following the logic.

Do you want to sell the current wheels in order to provide funds to buy some that you find more attractive? If so, I guess you will still have to buy the replacements first! 

If you cannot find a buyer for them as they are, then you probably realise it’s not worth you spending even a modest amount to improve their appearance which may attract a buyer.

David’s approach is great, but of course you must be prepared to spend time, skills and money on materials to add value to what you want to sell. 

Having said all that, £150/wheel sounds a bit expensive, but the design is complex as you say. 

On a positive note if you do want to spend on them then I would be asking for recommendations from small local car sales sites. These folks generally know where to get such things done at reasonable cost. 

Kind regards,

Gareth. 

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Thanks for your comments.

 

The spray was Halfords BMW Titan/Titanium Silver. Just happened I had tha colour BMW four years ago when I decided to refurb daughters Honda alloys and used that paint as a test on one wheel as I had a can to hand.

Personally I like its slightly muted look compared with some of the bright alloy finishes in cans sold as Wheel Silver.

 

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Many thanks David. I would expect that that would be useful information for anyone embarking on doing a similar job.

Clearcoat/lacquer? Not previously encountered before, but over the last couple of years, I have been finding the a couple of popular makes of lacquer used have crazed after a couple of months, despite careful application according to instructions. 

Just wondered which brand you use. 

Kind regards,

Gareth. 

 

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I'd bought the large can Halfords clear but it spat tiny bits onto the surface (I tried all the ones I'd bought and they were the same) so I returned for refund and bought a different brand which was fine... but forget what that was.

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In my opinion spraymax 2k is the closest you'll get to professional clear coat from a can, it's not cheap at 35 a can but its UV resistant the lot. I used to refurb my head lights👌

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Hello Daryl,

Perhaps a word of warning to those who may be tempted to follow your advice- specialist breathing mask equipment should be worn when using normal 2K products. It is designed for professional and not DIY use. Unlike DIY acrylic/cellulose products which dry with exposure to air, 2K dries by a hardening chemical reaction ( a la body fillers), so if you don’t want to have fine hardening mist in your lungs, then don’t use it without the appropriate equipment. And that’s before you consider the effects of the chemicals used in the hardening process. 

Kind regards,

Gareth. 

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