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Give my car away


Sweeters
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20171126_100722.thumb.jpg.3e5f6f6d0467f568d7fab1d2e7a3b030.jpgI have an Audi A3 1999.. I'm looking to see if there's anyone out there that is interested in starting a project with this car has a do not want to scrap it... I want to know it's will be in good hands

Edited by Sweeters
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Hi a little detail would be good, milage and any history, and perhaps some panoramic views of the interior does it run etc, its a kind offer but you will only attract interest with the most info given so at least the prospective owner will have an idea of what they are taking on regardless of it being free.

Steve.

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I am so sorry About that as it is my 1st time posting an ad. The car run's it has about a 180000 miles on the clock  The interior needs to be changed  The front dashboard needs to be screwed in as their  Screws is missing Hence the reason why I want to give the car to someone that will restore it back to its natural beauty I will post more photos if you like

Edited by Sweeters
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I hate to disillusion you, but given what you have said about the condition I can not imagine anybody being willing to invest the time and money in restoring a 23 year old wreck. No matter how much sentimental value it may have for you, it is time to accept that it is scrap and sell it for parts.

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Hello Chris, 

You certainly have the right sentiment, but in reality, you may find it’s not that easy ‘to give it away’ as you think. You have to recognise that someone will have to invest money and time to restore the car, and the simple parts expenditure may render this as not such an economical proposition as may be expected. Add to this the cost of transportation and you could find the takers are limited. 
If this were mine, I would be approaching my local ethnics college ( who have a motor vehicle section) to see if they would take it for work demonstration purposes - they may. What better home than it being used to teach skills to a new generation.

Of course, someone on here may well show interest. 
Hope some of this helps, 

Kind regards,

Gareth. 

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17 hours ago, cliffcoggin said:

I hate to disillusion you, but given what you have said about the condition I can not imagine anybody being willing to invest the time and money in restoring a 23 year old wreck. No matter how much sentimental value it may have for you, it is time to accept that it is scrap and sell it for parts.

Always the optimist Clifford, in my life time I have seen many cars in worse condition turned into practically concours with time and patience just because they can.

Steve.

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19 hours ago, Stevey Y said:

Always the optimist Clifford, in my life time I have seen many cars in worse condition turned into practically concours with time and patience just because they can.

Steve.

So have I Steve. Classic or old cars which are in short supply will always find a buyer willing to restore them, but A3s are as common as muck and available all over the country at low prices. The example under discussion needs a new interior as well as a new exterior, and that's before the 180000 miles old running gear is even considered.

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5 hours ago, cliffcoggin said:

So have I Steve. Classic or old cars which are in short supply will always find a buyer willing to restore them, but A3s are as common as muck and available all over the country at low prices. The example under discussion needs a new interior as well as a new exterior, and that's before the 180000 miles old running gear is even considered.

Hi I cite the case of the Cooper S on Bangers and Cash, it was on a pallet with barely any un rusted panels but it still made telephone number bids at auction, with regards to common as muck which could produce suitable donor parts from recycling outlets take a look at the humble Fords, MK3 Cortinas, MK2 Escorts, there was loads of them produced and then they suddenly disappeared, you would pay five grand for a well used car now and a whole lot more for a pristine model, its all about forward thinking what is common now could well be not so common and very desirable in ten years when the world is full of electric and hybrid cars that no one can fix or wants, so if you have the time and willpower not to mention space, why not.

 

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Good points Steve. Indeed any (in caps) over 20 year old Ford will be an investment and will be worthy of renovation. Unfortunately it cannot be claimed that any ( again in caps) Audi of similar vintage can currently claim the same status. In the future ? No doubt virtually any fossil fuel vehicle is likely to follow the same ‘investment’ route if (certainly in caps) we are allowed to keep them without wallet buckling tax penalties - just look at the volume of low mileage prestige cars currently coming into the country due to the Japanese owners considering the tax liabilities not worth supporting. 
We are talking a humble car here, and some of the opinions mentioned will be valid, but let’s hope someone does come along and take it on. If not, then the forum has provided the OP with some positive alternatives. 
Kind regards,

Gareth. 

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23 hours ago, Magnet said:

Good points Steve. Indeed any (in caps) over 20 year old Ford will be an investment and will be worthy of renovation. Unfortunately it cannot be claimed that any ( again in caps) Audi of similar vintage can currently claim the same status. In the future ? No doubt virtually any fossil fuel vehicle is likely to follow the same ‘investment’ route if (certainly in caps) we are allowed to keep them without wallet buckling tax penalties - just look at the volume of low mileage prestige cars currently coming into the country due to the Japanese owners considering the tax liabilities not worth supporting. 
We are talking a humble car here, and some of the opinions mentioned will be valid, but let’s hope someone does come along and take it on. If not, then the forum has provided the OP with some positive alternatives. 
Kind regards,

Gareth. 

Hi, precisely, there is a large market over here for ex Japanese grey imports because they are better specced than their European brothers and the average Japanese owner gets more money selling his car to the exporters as is won't incur any tax, scrapping it does.

Steve.

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Thanks Steve, I think it’s more to do with the Japanese ‘Road tax’ system being based on current emissions requirements, and the tax paid is highly influenced by the degree the vehicle fails to meet these (current) requirements. The older the car the greater the differential between acceptable emission limits when built, and emission requirements now, and the tax penalties render them uneconomical to retain in the country - hence they are exported. 
How long before that happens here? 
Kind regards,

Gareth. 

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