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  1. Steve Q

    Steve Q

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  3. jdragon

    jdragon

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  4. Stevey Y

    Stevey Y

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Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/12/2022 in all areas

  1. For how cheap the part is I wouldn't put it off in my opinion. Especially when the braking system is arguably the most important system in the car.
    2 points
  2. I'd change the sensor anyway if you haven't already as the car could just be masking the problem in your case. I'd advise changing the sensor anyway. As it could lead to a big bill otherwise. Bet safe than sorry in my opinion.
    2 points
  3. And every time you touch the brakes even lightly during that time, it's draining your finite power from your ABS module. Replace it now before you have a £3k+ bill
    2 points
  4. Well Steve, your mention of decency to respond, sums it up in a couple of words. It doesn’t add any on-cost to the already free! - and welcoming- service, yet some must think that attribute is an unnecessary skill to acquire these days. I find myself thinking ‘nice car, pity you didn’t order it with the optional manners pack!’ , but there again, I’m old fashioned - well old anyway! It’s interesting to hear that you too get a well deserved satisfaction from helping others, and that Steve Q does as well. That’s great, now we have at least three guaranteed, and I sure a few others too. Keep enjoying that Steve. There must be very few forums which can benefit from such experience gained from almost galaxial mileage usage, and the necessary problem solving which goes with it - and all to try to earn a living. Many thanks again and kind regards, Gareth.
    2 points
  5. I have been into cars and car clubs for way too many years. I started out in a car club as there was no Internet (well it had only just started) I was the chairman of a club and we all complained about the members leaving to join these new forum things.... then we joined them too, then it all happened again people started to disappear over to that face ache page and the forum that was once so busy you couldn't keep up with the posts is luck to get 10 post a day, it's as some would say progress, personally I loved the old pub meets, meet up before shows, travelling in convoy ..... yes with cb radios. I feel old. Oh it's my second post, don't know how long I will be here I've heard there's yet another technical advancement coming. Thank you all (in advance) for your advice which I dare say I will need. Tony
    1 point
  6. Sounds really like a battery problem .. these cars are VERY easily upset if the battery is not in really good condition... and a simple voltage check with a meter is no where near a good enough check,, the battery needs to be checked with a PROPER PROFFESIONAL battery checking device... there might well be enough "oomph" in the battery to start the engine .. but the voltage drops as the battery recharges and numerous other circuits kick in is often enough to cause many problems of the type you describe..... this of course assumes the alternator is also in good condition ... as that is what actually provides all the electrics the car needs !!
    1 point
  7. I'm on my second hybrid (both been company cars), current one is around 1 month old and I do really like it. That said, if you're looking at this as an economy saving, if you're driving sensibly you will get in the area of 400 miles from a filled petrol tank. Sadly I don't have the ability to charge the battery right now, but when the car has had charge you are likely to get around 30-40 miles of pure electric driving. The self-charging system absolutely drinks the tank and can't recommend it, but I don't have enough experience to tell you if when fully charged, it impacts the petrol mileage. To drive? It's really fun, the older model of hybrid that I had which was a 19 plate from memory handled quite poorly. This one on the other hand is much nicer but I'm not sure if that's down to it having a more sportier profile. Let me know if you want anymore info on it, happy to help.
    1 point
  8. Welcome to the forum Jimmy, you'll find the members on here are a friendly and helpful bunch 🙂 Lovely looking A4 not surprised you can't wait to get it!
    1 point
  9. overall i'm happy with it. vidmate online saveinsta
    1 point
  10. I've looked at similar for my a6. Think sach do an uprated clutches as well as CG Motorsport. As I suspect you'll have a duel mass flywheel like me my plan was to upgrade this with a new or beefed up duel mass flywheel. I don't like the idea of single flywheel conversions. Let's face it, Audi don't invest all the money into design and engineering for no reason in my opinion.
    1 point
  11. Hi Jamie I had mine fitted by Autologics. Really good job, took about 1.5 hours at home. I know mine is an A6 but I think they do all Audi's. Tony
    1 point
  12. I dropped the convertible into Norwich Audi late yesterday (when I could get a lift back), and told them I was happy for them to have it for a couple of days if needed. My buddy Kev has just sent me the following pics, and tells me the jobs are going well...🤞😃
    1 point
  13. The fact that you are driving it daily is increasing the risk of bricking the abs system!!! There's more risk that the abs hits another 'cycle' trigger, which it's not possible to do if you don't drive the car. If possible, use another car if you have access, public transport or hire a car while you wait for the part to be delivered.
    1 point
  14. Welcome to the club
    1 point
  15. as Kev has brought this back to life, i just wanted to add my tupence. agree with Gareth that keeping the car sounds like false economy. The car is just going to depreciate unless it becomes a classic. If you are keeping it, check the battery quality and it is holding charge (I'd disconnect it for a day and check the voltage drop). Change if needed. I use £15 (bought ages ago) 5w solar charger with long wires, and connect directly to my MOTORBIKE battery. Absolutely fine during the winter months with zero usage. This should in theory be okay for your car.
    1 point
  16. I thought I was too; my old A4 behaved nothing like this when the same motor failed 😄 It's fully accessible from inside the car without needing to remove anything. I've got the workshop manual, so I'll attach it later when I'm home. The flap positions need to be reset when the motor has been installed.
    1 point
  17. It definitely appears so. The motor is £219 Inc VAT from Audi. They've updated the part which is indicated by the 'A' at the end of the number 4M0.820.511.A
    1 point
  18. Hi Steve, thank you for considering this, and for the feedback. Was is TPI_2050077-7 posted on Apr 27th? I enquired about the EGR cooler with a VAG specialist I've taken the cars to for around 8 years (to get a feel for the "what if") and they said it's a 6 hour job totaling ~£900 with a new EGR valve and cooler assembly. Cleaning is a possibility but they didn't recommend it because most of the cost is labour. They also recommended changing the sensors for the reasons you suggested, as the overall cost is insignificant. And the quality of AdBlue can attribute to this greatly. Definitely not on the same level as the A4 ha. It wouldn't be my luck for it to come down to the sensor. I had the MIL come on the dash, so I've raised it with the warranty company and will see how it goes. Given these engines can do in excess of 300k if serviced, the recirculation system is a disaster.
    1 point
  19. So I thought I'd give it a few days before updating so as not to jinx it but the problem appears to be cured. It appears the black lead connecting to the positive terminal may not have been making good contact, the specialists were able to exactly replicate the symptoms by just removing it, the end of the 150A flat fuse below it was looking a bit sorry for itself so they cleaned that up and touch wood it's been fine since. Battery is good and drain after 30mins is 0.01A. I also noticed yesterday the engine fan was working (hadn't realised I'd not heard that recently if that makes sense), I did check the car about an hour later to make sure it had definitely stopped. They advised the next step should the issue persist is start dismantling the car to trace where that lead goes as after it disappears into the body of the car, they estimated 4-5 hours labour and were reluctant to charge me for that if it doesn't need to be done. Probably just in my head but it feels nicer to drive and more responsive. Sorry to hear about you needing a replacement CCM, that's one invoice I'm dreading
    1 point
  20. You're welcome 🙂 not going to lie, running old Audi's is an expensive business. But in my case it's a labour of love.
    1 point
  21. The steering rack needs to be coded to the car. Have you had the right one fitted? I believe your rack should be a gen 3 due to the cars age. I'd recommend a diagnostic check to see what fault codes flag up.
    1 point
  22. The later version should work with more recent maps. Might be worth you talking to the company that fitted the upgraded mmi to double check. If it can have the more up to date SD card then I'd recommend looking on eBay.
    1 point
  23. TriplePundit recently had an opportunity to speak to the director of sustainability and government affairs at Audi of America. What particularly piqued our interest in speaking with him is, not only is it atypical to combine sustainability and government affairs into one role at a car company, but in this case, the role is occupied by a person who is also a climate scientist. We were interested to understand how placing a climate scientist in this role helps Audi navigate and perhaps drive an auto industry increasingly committed to electrification, and to learn what lies ahead for the company and for an industry in flux. Spencer Reeder, who started out as a chemical and materials scientist, is the person driving these efforts at Audi of America. Having previously worked for Boeing on environmental programs, and in particular, researching ways to reduce the toxicity of products used in the aerospace industry, Reeder later went back to graduate school to study earth sciences. This led him to focus on geophysics and climate science, and later to developing the environmental portfolio for Microsoft Co-founder Paul Allen’s philanthropic organization. Four years into his current role at Audi, we asked Reeder to talk a bit about Audi placing sustainability and government affairs in one role, and his approach to the job. “It’s only when you align government policy advocacy work with sustainability goals, that you truly mean what you say” he explains, adding that when he came on board he was “going to be a loud voice for this” both in terms of his engagement with the industry but importantly, internally within Audi. By this he meant, he saw his role as one which needed to inspire the organization to see sustainability as something that would become part of its DNA. This was particularly important because around that time, Audi’s parent company, Volkswagen, was recently emerging from its “dieselgate” scandal. Though Reeder recognizes he is just one voice in a large organization, aligning sustainability with government affairs manifests in things like opposing the previous administrations’ efforts to roll back national fuel economy standards. Audi, as part of VW, was one of only four car companies which joined with California to maintain more stringent mileage standards, for example. Audi also aggressively prices carbon emissions within its own organization. Setting a price of $200 per ton — a level higher than industry standard, by an order of magnitude — Reeder says, rather than operating this as “shadow pricing,” the company actually makes a transfer of funds which is then used to undertake further CO2 mitigation activities internally. “The only way to effect long term change is through pricing carbon into your business systemically,” Reeder asserts. Reeder was also a voice internally advocating for the company to lean-in to battery electric vehicle (BEV) technology for the future, even over competing technologies such as fuel cells. With that in mind, we asked him what he thinks the opportunities and impediments are for electric vehicles (EVs) in the short term. First of all, he says customer demand is “very strong” though concedes it remains quite regionalized at the moment. Unlike California, many states have yet to make strong commitments to EVs, but Audi is not having any difficulty selling the ones it’s producing. Unfortunately, though, for the time being at least, costs are heading in an adverse direction. “Things are going to get more expensive before they get cheaper,” Reeder says. This is a result of higher commodity prices, and supply chain shortages in general — the latter, or course, impacting many industries in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Another important challenge Reeder identifies is the need for better charging infrastructure. Federal funding, he says, is “completely insufficient,” especially at this moment when he believes EVs have passed the point of the early adopter phase and are quickly moving into the initial stages of the mass market. He warns, “the mass market won’t tolerate inconvenience.” As such, he says, broadly distributed fast charging infrastructure will be necessary to sustain the mass market, equipped with 150 kW fast chargers at a minimum. Given Reeder’s chemical and materials science background, we were keen to ask him about end-of-life battery considerations, since this is often cited by EV detractors as an environmental concern associated with the push towards electric vehicles. As well as identifying energy storage as an important second-life use for vehicle batteries, he is quite bullish on the opportunities for battery recycling, even to the point that recycling valuable battery components may even help wind down raw materials extraction at some point in the future. Indeed, Reeder says, most vehicle batteries probably won’t be repurposed for energy storage, so it is “critical for Audi to have a closed-loop life cycle for batteries.” The automaker's goals are to have reduced its carbon footprint by 30 percent by 2025 compared with 2019 levels and for 30 percent of its vehicle portfolio to be fully BEV or plug-in hybrid by 2025. Image credit: Audi media relations https://www.triplepundit.com/story/2022/climate-scientist-sustainability-audi/744361
    1 point
  24. Lol I have to cater for all interests when publishing the news articles. In all seriousness I have considered converting the Audi to what ever power they deem fit when they ban it. I do love my A6. Once the engine goes bank I'm going to fit a tuned engine. I'm already getting the plans drawn up and build cost already.
    1 point
  25. How right you are. Went in 6 weeks ago and ordered 4 x Goodyear Vector 4 season tyres. £700. Delay after delay means they’re not here yet, and the tyre chap tells me they’ve gone up ….. I did fancy the Michelin Crossclimate but they were £800 for a set, they’re still that price but the Goodyears are now only £1 cheaper, and they’re still a fortnight away. So Michelins it will be in the next two weeks.
    1 point
  26. Hello Dan, Thanks for being g in touch with the forum. Genuine wheels are aimed such that their load bearing is through the centre of the hub bearing. Displacing that loading by using spacers can be bad news for bearings. Kind regards, Gareth.
    1 point
  27. When looking at one with a CVT, see if the car has a towbar. The CVT doesn't take too kindly for a lot of towing.
    1 point
  28. Hi being as D5S 25w are fitted to most of the new vehicles that are not LED spec the D1S D2S D3S are becoming redundant stock so best they get rid quick, the other thing is D5S bulbs have the ballast built into the bulb, cheaper to produce. Steve.
    1 point
  29. Good point. I was thinking if the battery was failing then stop/start would fail too.
    1 point
  30. Hi Cambelt is a must, the HID bulbs and ballasts are no major money as the bulbs are D3S which are old hat and you can get a pair of Lumex upgrades for about £70 and the ballasts for about £30 each as they are the same ones used in Skoda,VW, and some Fords, if you buy one make sure its manual as they are bullet proof as long as the gear oil is changed, brakes are relatively cheap as they used the same brake/disc combo on most other models its called globalisation but depending what model you have the price according to the dealer will go up so buy O.E. spec, Febi,Borg Warner, Bosch, Blueprint. Steve.
    1 point
  31. so the cambelt and cvt seem to be the main expenses?
    1 point
  32. Hi, I thought I would give you an update on my A4 Avant. Our local garage stripped the head down and found that a spring on one of the inlet valves in cylinder one had broken, causing no combustion and therefore zero compression. It was nothing to do with the cam chain! This explains why only one cylinder was affected and why the engine had NO power. The head is going to an engine specialist on Saturday to be fully reconditioned and will basically be returned like a brand new head, complete with new strengthened timing chain, all new gaskets and seals, etc. Hopefully the bill won't be over £1,200 all in. I love Audi's! I have a 21 year old Audi TT Mark 1 Quattro Coupe 1800 225bhp and a 9 Year old Mark 2 Audi TT 1.8 S Line TFSI. I am SO relieved about the diagnosis of the A4! I went to the Audi Beaulieu event as I'm such an enthusiast! Thank you for your input!
    1 point
  33. Excellent thank you that’s very helpful I have been trying to find the Quattro sline the same as mine but that gives me some ideas now thank you
    1 point
  34. I do think the units and wiring are different. Depending what's wrong with it, it might be able to be repaired.
    1 point
  35. Here you go: https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/325186247724?mkcid=16&mkevt=1&mkrid=711-127632-2357-0&ssspo=_a6wjbz-Q7a&sssrc=2349624&ssuid=IE07kO4STZy&var=&widget_ver=artemis&media=COPY https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/275278758639?mkcid=16&mkevt=1&mkrid=711-127632-2357-0&ssspo=OyAYDJySSRy&sssrc=2349624&ssuid=IE07kO4STZy&var=&widget_ver=artemis&media=COPY https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/224961146362?mkcid=16&mkevt=1&mkrid=711-127632-2357-0&ssspo=nadmyyx9QoO&sssrc=2349624&ssuid=IE07kO4STZy&var=&widget_ver=artemis&media=COPY https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/325153814522?mkcid=16&mkevt=1&mkrid=711-127632-2357-0&ssspo=UlaB1rXcRPa&sssrc=2349624&ssuid=IE07kO4STZy&var=&widget_ver=artemis&media=COPY https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/373948829545?mkcid=16&mkevt=1&mkrid=711-127632-2357-0&ssspo=d2zHt1cMQLi&sssrc=2349624&ssuid=IE07kO4STZy&var=&widget_ver=artemis&media=COPY https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/203664203207?mkcid=16&mkevt=1&mkrid=711-127632-2357-0&ssspo=c7t-lpf4riu&sssrc=2349624&ssuid=IE07kO4STZy&var=&widget_ver=artemis&media=COPY https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/394068930847?mkcid=16&mkevt=1&mkrid=711-127632-2357-0&ssspo=43dygdqbqfs&sssrc=2349624&ssuid=IE07kO4STZy&var=&widget_ver=artemis&media=COPY Obviously it'll depend on the mileage, service history record and how many owners too. But these links will give you a rough guide.
    1 point
  36. MILES ARE OK BUT BUY ONE WITH 6 SPEED MANUAL BOX NO AUTOS AS HAD NOWT BUT GREEF WITH CVT BOXES
    1 point
  37. Hey Joe, Usually the servicing schedule will say which ever comes first. So it could be 2 years or X miles. I personally have always had an oil change done yearly for peace of mind.
    1 point
  38. 80 miles daily?? I would say Diesel is a no brainer. My own opinion.
    1 point
  39. I think the real world figures are mud-late 30s.
    1 point
  40. samething happened me here in eire with mt 2002 tt,i got a new set for 300 euro from lithuania ,and what i didnt know is that theres a little switch in the back which changes them from lhd to rhd,very handy.theyre not genuine audi lights but they look very well.
    1 point
  41. Hi @Wakior ....welcome to the Club Where are you based in France?
    1 point
  42. Welcome from a UK B8 owner
    1 point
  43. Welcome to the forum you'll find the members on here are a friendly and helpful bunch 🙂
    1 point
  44. With the electrical gremlins it's worth checking the quality of the battery as a failing battery can cause all sorts of electrical system issues.
    1 point
  45. I heard its the 8 speed tiptronic gearbox that's the problem. Apparently the 7 speed s tronic on the smaller engines is a lot better.
    1 point
  46. The Renaissance Series, Classic Works of Art Recreated With Mechanics in an Old Garage The Creation of Adam Photographer Freddy Fabris has created “The Renaissance Series“, a wonderful interpretation of several classic master paintings of the eponymous time recreated in “an old Midwest car shop” with striking male models posing in mechanic’s uniforms. Fabris explained how he came up with the idea on Huffington Post. Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp The Last Supper Portraits Portraits Portraits photos by Freddy Fabris via Huffington Post
    1 point
  47. 1 point
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