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  1. Hiya, I am selling my Black 2001 A8 D2 Quattro with 133K miles on it, and I am offering it up on here as spares and repairs hoping someone will buy it to restore rather than break it? It has MOT till 18th of February 2023, she starts and runs and the gearbox is fine but unfortunately it has developed a slight misfire. I need a fuel efficient reliable car for commuting and I don't have the time or room to fix it? I have owned the car for 9 years and over that time spent lots on it, I've had the cambelt replaced several times (once even by the main stealers), the radiator replaced and even a brand new Audi drivers side CAT fitted! Unfortunately she's getting a bit tired now and the last MOT she passed flagged up a few advisories and its time for me to let her go. These are getting rarer everyday and she was registered early enough to be in the cheaper car tax bracket! She is located in East Sussex near Eastbourne and she is priced to sell at 600 pounds.
    2 points
  2. Hi if you take the top plastic cover off above the radiator which from memory is two plastic plunge clips that should give you a better view of it all, mark where each pulley touches the belt with tippex and do a drawing of each pulley and the way the belt travels either behind or over that particular pulley, good kit Dayco and INA are used as o.e., I wouldn't get involved with changing the alternator freewheel clutch in situ as they can be an absolute cow when the alternator is out of the car and on a bench these clutches normally fail way after the alternator and as most replacement alternators have a new clutch fitted its probably a fruitless and consuming exercise, only other tip is make sure you have the belt running true when you pull the tension pin out to release the spring tensioner as you will need Neanderthal strength to pull it back again if you get it wrong and remember to turn the engine over by hand a few turns to settle the ribs on the belt into their grooves, I have seen the new belts try and ride off of the crank pulley. Steve.
    2 points
  3. You’re very welcome thanks for coming back to let me know! T
    2 points
  4. Hi Sonny1 I am no expert on Cabriolet electric roofs but when I have had similar problems I usually keep trying different things and usually get the problem resolved. I would try to reset the roof by putting the roof down manually making sure the boot lid and the roof compartment cover are closed properly, turn the ignition off then on and try raising the roof electrically. Micro switches on the boot lid and the roof compartment cover latches play a big part in the smooth operation of the roof. hope this works for you! Turlough.
    2 points
  5. Just an update. Ive managed to get some E5 and have been told its not a problem at the moment. I found some additives for £12 that would do 4 full tanks of E10 so thats something i would consider if i couldnt get E5 again. The car does run so much better on E5 tho.
    1 point
  6. Hi Gents just bringing this out in to the forum domain, I have found a wonderful little service kit on eBay, its made by a company called Alco in Europe who have been going for fifty years making high quality filters they even make their own filter mediums in house, I have used these filters for 18000 miles [two services] and had no problems whatsoever, every part fits as it should and is very well made, the kit contains Air,Oil and carbonised cabin filter as well as a new sump plug and for forty quid its a good deal which only leaves the oil and fuel filter which if you are DIY is sub a hundred quid for all your parts. Steve.
    1 point
  7. Pleased to report its all back together and the needle is sitting nicely at 90! Thanks for your contributions chaps
    1 point
  8. Hello Richard, Many thanks for joining and posting a very informative advert, for what seems to be a ‘nice buy for someone’. Let’s hope it finds a deserving home. Kind regards, Gareth.
    1 point
  9. I think e5 is selling out faster as people aren't trusting E10. It's all a money making scam as cars running on E10 are getting less mpg.
    1 point
  10. I know on my A6 the whole front has to come off to access the belts 🤦‍♂️
    1 point
  11. Had a go today.finding it very difficult to do. theres no room to mark things up or take things off.any advice please ive seen someone take the bumper etc and move the framework forward just enough to get to the belt and pulleys seems a lot of work and doing this job on my own wont be easy.But willing to do whatever it takes to do the job.thanks all
    1 point
  12. Quick update on this . It’s a pig of a job !! Removed alternator and air con pump to gain access . Maybe easier removing inlet manifold and throttle body but will need a new gasket if you go down that route . I’ll update when we have it back together if it cures the problem . As per Gareth’s advice you do indeed require an extra gasket . Thank you Gareth 👍
    1 point
  13. Hi Mitch, unfortunately I did not get to see the actual codes that were being logged. Just a very helpful Audi specialist who read the codes and was able to fix the issue. It is possible that the flashing glow plug lamp on the dash could indicate a multitude of faults but in each case mine were the emissions temperature sensors. Hope it is something simple. Tom
    1 point
  14. Has anyone used these inflatable mattresses? My boot is used for the various gear I carry on my road trips hence why a full bed won't work. I have a 2002 Audi a6 estate. Thanks all 🙂
    1 point
  15. Turlough that worked! Reset the roof back to fully open position then the normal switch to close it began functioning again. Full open/close function now restored. you’re a legend! Thanks again for your help. S
    1 point
  16. An update as I visited an indie shop nearby and an official Audi dealership. The local mechanics had discovered it was the coolant shut-off valve 4H0 121 671D. A simple solenoid, which intermittently gets stuck in a semi-closed or fully closed position. As I understood the schematics, this valve is preventing the (cold) coolant from circulating through the heater to make the engine warm up faster. According to multiple other forums' threads, it is very often stuck but many times in the open position, which of course goes unnoticed by owners. The worst is when an older revision part (B at the end) starts leaking and pushing coolant through the socket onto the wires, but this didn't happen in my case. All electrics is intact. Diagnostics (and temporary fix) are fairly simple: knock on it with something chunky such as a screwdriver handle a few times and observe the heat coming back. Importantly, it wouldn't show in the errors (unless the electrics is damaged and the circuit is always open/short) because there's no flow sensor and the device itself is passive. The only error related to the AC/heater I had was B108C07 related to the motor controlling the left air flap. And I am very glad I went to an indie shop first because I suspect the dealership, even if things were covered by the warranty, would do unnecessary replacements of the heater core, pump, thermostat, etc eventually damaging the system's integrity. To me, it was very confusing because it really reminded of a possible airlock, especially since there was a correlation between me adding coolant/revving up the engine and the heater getting back to life. Perhaps a stronger coolant flow would indeed push the valve into its place, who knows. The aux pump mentioned in the first message was suspicious too because of the outgoing hose being cold, but this was probably due to the closed valve, which also makes sense in retrospect. Anyways, the dealership are now requesting if the replacement is covered by the warranty and will fix it, including flushing and re-filling the entire cooling system. I am a bit skeptical about the latter but I guess it's ok as soon as they know what they're doing.
    1 point
  17. Don't forget if you enable it and don't have the appropriate stalk and then have an accident your insurance would be void as you've modified the car.
    1 point
  18. Hi Sonny1 would you like to say what the problems are.
    1 point
  19. yeah theyre not too bad,the ones in the pictures looks very snug!we used them camping and they were a lot nicer than sleeping on the ground.
    1 point
  20. How old is the battery? A failing battery can throw up all sorts of fault codes through electrical gremlins. What are the other issues it's throwing up?
    1 point
  21. Hi will,on my A3 I used an adapter from my phone to mmi and downloaded android auto app and this allows you to get various apps like utube news weather etc,hope you get on ok regards David Wise
    1 point
  22. Hi Faisal, regrettably with all the fantastic help I had here from stevey, no I didn't. I poured money into it changing each sensor, changing turber, EGR cooler etc and it was never right again. In the end I got rid and went back to BMW 😅 But what I will say is because I had the DPF removed and remapped, this could of been hiding the true fault. But I didn't have the heart to put more money into it. Sorry I couldn't help further
    1 point
  23. Lol I sure do, however I'm not that committed where I'll work late on a car lol. I still can't believe you had to go to such lengths to make one fit. I'm shocked there wasn't an off the shelf item.
    1 point
  24. yeah steve is right,this is a very common problem with avants.
    1 point
  25. Problem solved, to cut a long story short I bought a similar Audi motor/linkage assembly, swapped the motors over, and did some judicious grinding on one of the linkages to achieve the desired throw on the wiper arms. More of a faff than it should've been but I got there in the end. If anyone has the same problem finding this particular linkage (8P2955023G) feel free to drop me a line and I'll be happy to explain in more detail, and thanks for everyone who offered help.
    1 point
  26. Thanks. I can definitely make it better. Really pleased with the Autoglym black dye. Great product. I would highly recommend it. The boot carpet was transformed i felt.
    1 point
  27. New Members - please read before posting ! Be civil Don’t post anything that a reasonable person would consider offensive, abusive, or hate speech. Avoid confrontational responses to post content that may be different to your own personal beliefs. Everyone has their own opinion on different matters and this provides for diversity, so please avoid an argument. Be polite It doesn't cost anything to have manners and would be appreciated by the community if you included 'please and thank you' as required in your posts. Keep it clean Don’t post anything obscene or sexually explicit. Respect each other Don’t harass or troll anyone, impersonate people, or expose their private information. Be respectful to Moderating Staff and other members at all times. No politics or religion Nothing starts a fight faster than politics or religion, so we don't allow those discussions. Keep personal information private All posts in the forums are easily found via search engines, so unless you're willing to expose your information to the world, please do not post telephone numbers, e-mail addresses etc in your posts. Have a little patience We are a club made up of members who have to work days or nights so can’t always reply straight away, someone will get back to you as soon as they can, so please be bear with us. Thread titles Be accurate with your topic by giving a brief sentence of the problem, hint or tip you would like to get across to other members. These are not concrete terms with precise definitions — avoid even the appearance of any of these things. If you’re unsure, ask yourself whether you'd go on TV and publicly say it on camera. This is a public forum, and search engines index these discussions. Keep the language, links, and images safe for family and friends. Follow Up Please find the time to follow up your post with a conclusion (such as; that worked, tried that but didn't work, etc) so contributing members can see whether their advice and suggestions worked in this instance. You may receive an email asking you to add a conclusion to your post, please find the time to return to your post and marked it as solved.
    1 point
  28. The headlight switch is a common item to fail or catch fire on the A6 c5. Here's a guide on how to change it by pelican parts. Part number: 4B1941531C Also certain A6 c5 won't have the light adjustment such as the RS6 due to the RS6 having self leveling suspension and xenon headlights. Furthermore the older (pre facelift version, don't have the soft touch finish which generally lasts longer. The last picture shows the difference. Left facelift with soft touch plastic. Right prefacelift cars without soft touch plastic. in addition the height adjuster can fail often due to the plastic link bar breaking. Think it connects to the ARB. If it's in tact, then it's worth checking the levelling motors. They're about 20 quid new. 1. Turn the headlight switch to the off position and push the knob inward (green arrow). Turn the knob clockwise. As you turn it, the switch housing will eject itself from the dashboard. 2. Pull the switch out of the dashboard as shown here. You need to be able to access the electrical connection on the back side. 3. Press the tabs on the rear of the electrical connector (green arrows) and pull the connector off. The new switch is installed in the reverse order of removal. https://www.pelicanparts.com/techarticles/Audi_A6_C5/16-ELEC-Headlight_Switch_Replacement/16-ELEC-Headlight_Switch_Replacement.htm
    1 point
  29. Yea but you could blank it at both ends.
    1 point
  30. I'd recommend either turning it off on obd11 or fit the correct stalk. Let's face it Audi wouldn't fit a different stalk for cars with lane assist for no reason.
    1 point
  31. Hi Dan, Wow! From the description I was expecting a slow, quiet, rythmic tick-tick-tick once per cycle of the engine (two revolutions or so) that would signify maybe one or two hydraulic tappets having failed seals or something similar - wearing headphones (turned up too high) what I heard was a Pneumatic Hammer (like they use in Road Works) in comparison! That's a far more regular, and louder sound... I'm not familiar with the 2 litre four-pot Audi engines - though I did have a similar but quieter sound from a Ford Mondeo engine which turned out to be a stretched (as not changed when it should have been!) timing belt that effectively had delayed the timing just slightly causing the valves and pistons to kiss gently - minor marks but no bending in my case - but that was a petrol engine. Without trying to scaremonger or cause undue concern - as I said I'm new to Audi engines - that volume and rapid rythm would have me scurrying off to a garage to get it looked at, or at least an opinion given... It could simply be a bearing on one of the belt guide wheels, or the Alternator, or something loose, or similar... But it also could be far more serious. Best to get it looked at sooner rather than later...? Just my thoughts - not an expert. Best Regards, Tigger
    1 point
  32. Could be valve guide seals weeping a bit overnight. Try lifting your foot off the accelerator letting the wheels drive the car on over run, then accelerate fairly briskly if they is blue smoke it could be the valve guides.
    1 point
  33. Hey guys, Thank you all for your advice !! The issue was the fuel pump had failed and sent aluminium shards or dirt into into the engine Due to this 4 injectors were replaced along with the fuel pump and filter along with the tank being flushed out. The car was never incorrectly fuelled always was diesel never made that fatal mistake !! Car seems to be running well now but not sure if I trust it anymore
    1 point
  34. Hi this is what I keep trying to put across to people there is no such thing as cheap diagnostic units if you buy the best upper level of any platform you will get the best out of it, better still you don't have to pay the thieving Shiiiiiits at Audi their greedy rates, WIN,WIN. Steve.
    1 point
  35. Hi its Ok I have come across this idea before and recently on youtube with some lunatic hosing down the inlet pipe, it made me cringe as I was present when one of my fellow cabbies had driven his Toyota through a puddle at his speed which had caused compression lock when the mechanic took the head off the cylinder that had the snapped con rod had only about an egg cup of water in it, just enough to lock it up snap the rod in half and then the remainder of the con rod had bashed a hole through the block, game over. The brake fluid idea was used on old engines and did work as brake fluid melts carbon and can be burnt off when the plugs are reinstalled and the engine is started, my mechanic had a customer who was head of the local church he owned an old seventies Dolomite Sprint he used to do a lot of the work himself but didn't fancy a decoke himself so he tried my mechanic who was not keen as removing the cylinder head was nigh on impossible due to bi metal corrosion, all alloy engine, he suggested the cheap fix with brake fluid but forgot to tell him the engine should not be running when he did this just turned over with the plugs removed, the guys nickname was born again Bob and after he tried it with the engine running, when it flamed back through the carb and set light to his hair he was then renamed Burn again Bob which even he found funny. Steve.
    1 point
  36. Hi this method of decarbonising was used years ago on commercial Diesel engines, Gardener etc just the same as pouring brake fluid into carburettors on petrol engines [NOT WHILE RUNNING] and leaving overnight, carbon build up on the backs of valves is a common problem with direct injection systems, back in the days of inlet manifold mounted injection the mixture of fuel would keep the backs of the valves reasonably clear. Unless you want to scrap your engine observe the following, if you inadvertently spray in to much water you will cause whats known as compression lock as water is not a compressible medium this will have the effect of best case bending a con rod, worse case cause the con rod to snap, if you are super lucky the large chunks of carbon shaken loose will be inducted and go into super heat, then its the turn of the DPF to deal with these superheated fire balls which are so hot and hard that they just stick to the surface of the core eventually causing catastrophic failure of the core. Using a proprietary fuel additive will have the same effect by dissolving the carbon down to a more manageable size for the DPF to pass. Steve.
    1 point
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